May 20, 2015

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Outreach at Lund

Posted in Employees, New Horizons Educational Program, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Outreach tagged , , , , , , at 1:31 pm by Lund

Guest Blog from Kelsey Francis, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Outreach Specialist.

May is National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month—a time for youth, adolescents, parents, educators, service providers, and beyond to think about how pregnancy impacts the goals and future of young people, as well as how to protect themselves against unplanned pregnancy and STI transmission. It is also a time to educate and empower our youth and teens to be informed, intentional, and responsible about their sexual and reproductive health and wellness.

Kelsey in action at the "Let's Talk About Sex" screening hosted by Lund and Planned Parenthood Of Northern New England in celebration of National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month

Kelsey in action at the “Let’s Talk About Sex” screening hosted by Lund and Planned Parenthood Of Northern New England in celebration of National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month

Over the past 25 years, the United States has been making great strides in reducing the national teen pregnancy and teen birth rate. Since 1990, the teen pregnancy rate has declined by 51%, with the current rate of 57.4 pregnancies per 1000 girls, aged 15-19. The teen birth rate has also declined significantly, with a decrease of 57% since 1991. Currently, the national teen birth rate is situated at 26.5 births per 1000 girls, aged 15-19

Vermont has seen declines in both teen pregnancy and teen birth rates that surpass the national decreases. Since the peak year of 1988, Vermont’s teen pregnancy rate has decreased by 60%, and is currently 32 pregnancies per 1000 girls, aged 15-19. Vermont’s teen birth rate has seen a 63% decrease since 1991, currently reported at 14.5 births per 1000 girls, aged 15-19.

Despite great progress in reducing the national teen pregnancy and birth rates, teen pregnancy creates significant educational, social, and economic barriers for young mothers and fathers, as well as their children. Consider the following statistics:

  • Nearly 1 in 4 girls will become pregnant at least once before her 20th birthday
  • Of the young women who have a child before the age of 18, only 38% will receive a high school degree by their 22nd Only 2% will earn a college degree by the time they turn 30.
  • 9% of males aged 12-16 will father at least one child before his 20th birthday
  • Teen fathers are also 25-30% less likely to graduate from high school than their peers who have not fathered a child
  • Less than 25% of teen mothers receive any child support payments from the father of their child. 63% of teen mothers receive some form of public benefit within the first year her child is born.
  • Daughters of teen mothers are three times more likely to become pregnant during their teenage years themselves, compared to mothers who had a child at age 20-21.

Given the various immediate and long-term challenges associated with teenage pregnancy, prevention efforts are essential. Lund proudly offers several pathways to help our youth, clients, and community gain knowledge, insight, and perspective concerning teenage pregnancy. Our Teen Pregnancy Prevention Outreach (TPPO) Program combines accessible information and demonstrations regarding contraception and STI prevention with real-life stories about the realities of pregnancy and parenting at a young age. Additionally, our individualized services ensure that each client’s reproductive health and wellness needs are addressed and supported. Lund’s TPPO program and services work to empower our clients and community to be knowledgeable, thoughtful, and proactive about their bodies, their choices, and their lives.

Tune in next week, as we discuss more about Lund’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Outreach program!

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